Are fuel cell scooters coming?

 

At the Solutions Cop21 trade show coming up in Paris, Asia Pacific Fuel Cell Technologies Ltd (APFCT) is showing its new generation of fuel cell scooter.

APFCT is not a new comer. This Taiwanese company has been testing fuel cell scooters for several years, in Taiwan and in Hawaii. Several generations of its ZES scooters have been developed since 2010, all powered by two removable hydrogen canisters. The fuel cell was capable of a maximum power of 2.5 kW, allowing for a 35 mph top speed and a range of 35 to 50 miles. The price was quoted at around $3,500.

2012 ZES

2012 ZES

The 2012 test in Taiwan, funded by the government, involved 80 scooters offered free to the public to ride around at beach resort. Researchers monitored the scooters via their GPS system and analyzed a variety of data throughout the year, including driving time, location, direction, altitude, cruising distance, voltage, current and fuel cell stack temperature. The fuel cell system was analyzed for efficiency and compared to internal combustion engines to determine economic and well-to-wheels efficiency and emission advantages.

Screen Shot 2015-11-24 at 4.54.34 PM

So we are curious to see more of the new generation of APFCT’s fuel cell scooter, besides the picture at the top of this article. So far all we know is that its 2 hydrogen canisters are provided by the Swiss company AAQIUS, which is trying to make its STOR-H canister a standard for fuel cell-powered two-wheelers. AAQIUS hopes to develop a network of canister vending machines in 2017.

AAQUIS canisters

AAQUIS canisters

We know that Suzuki has also been working on a fuel cell scooter for several years now. It is safe to assume that the technology is ready, and it might just be a problem of cost and infrastructure holding back manufacturers. We should find out more very soon.

Written by
cleanrider.com
5 comments for this post
  1. rz'er wrote the 26/11/2015

    “AFCSC?” See Betteridge’s Law:

    http://laughingsquid.com/twitterbot-the-answer-is-no-responds-no-to-questions-posed-by-headlines/

    No parallel highway network will be funded and installed without leveraging an existing network. In this case, leveraging retail delivery (for the canisters) puts it behind Gogoro- a company that is incumbent and expanding. It certainly puts it behind Mainland scooters, which plug into domestic sockets and thus need no network at all. Should Gogoro allow any sort of charging (besides its own kiosks), then it’s receivership for APFCT.

    Reply
    • Albert wrote the 26/11/2015

      I don’t think it is more difficult to install a network of canister vending machines than battery vending machines. If several brands of scooters use the same canister standard, it might actually be a good idea, allowing for different technologies to fight it out in the market.

      Reply
      • Albert wrote the 26/11/2015

        So which is better, a closed network (GOGORO), or an open network (AAQIUS)?

        Reply
        • rz'er wrote the 03/12/2015

          A network that doesn’t need hydrogen delivery and replenishment- only a copper line. To an existing grid. Or do you think hydrogen appears out of thin air, like Hyundai?

          Reply
          • Albert wrote the 03/12/2015

            Canisters vending machines could be refilled the same way soda vending machines are being refilled.

            Reply
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